Mast Antenna

SuvE

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First Name
Gary
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Oct 14, 2020
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Arizona
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2021 F150, 2019 Mustang
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Retired
Pretty much every picture I have seen of the new F150 shows an old fashioned mast antenna on the passenger side hood up near the windshield. Anybody know why there is a mast vs. the more typical shark fin or in-glass antenna? I don't really have a problem with it other than a potential problem going through a car wash. Just curious as to why a mast is now required.
 

Agashi25

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Arban
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Chicago
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Pretty much every picture I have seen of the new F150 shows an old fashioned mast antenna on the passenger side hood up near the windshield. Anybody know why there is a mast vs. the more typical shark fin or in-glass antenna? I don't really have a problem with it other than a potential problem going through a car wash. Just curious as to why a mast is now required.
Nobody here will have this answer. Sorry. Lol

Can confirm all pre production trucks I’ve seen have traditional mast on passenger side of hood.
 

05RubiconLJ

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Matt
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Arkansas
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Pretty much every picture I have seen of the new F150 shows an old fashioned mast antenna on the passenger side hood up near the windshield. Anybody know why there is a mast vs. the more typical shark fin or in-glass antenna? I don't really have a problem with it other than a potential problem going through a car wash. Just curious as to why a mast is now required.
I am not an expert, nor do I have the definitive answer, but I believe it has to do with signal distance and customer demographics. The longer 'whip' antenna allows the truck to pick up an AM/FM radio signal at a distance much greater than that of any other antenna configuration. While that makes no difference to someone in a major metropolitan city, it makes a big difference to someone using the truck out in rural America. Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, the Dakota's, and so on, where customer are buying these trucks for work or pleasure, but live/work in less populated areas need that additional signal strength. If you were to head out of a major city in an F-150 and a friend in a competitors truck, with no stick antenna, both listening to the same station, you would be listening to the station far longer than your friend., theoretically. Ford's demographic data must show that keeping the antenna is important to their customer base.
 

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