uavmx

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
108
Reaction score
30
Location
Albuquerque
Vehicles
2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee
Not that I would ever do it, or condone it, but does anyone make a widget that overcomes the steering wheel sensor? Like something you clip on to make it think your hands are on the wheel?
 

21limited

Member
First Name
James
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
3
Location
Orlando
Vehicles
2021 f150
Not that I would ever do it, or condone it, but does anyone make a widget that overcomes the steering wheel sensor? Like something you clip on to make it think your hands are on the wheel?
1.5 lb velco wrist weight works perfectly.
 

Andyc

Member
First Name
Andrew
Joined
Dec 17, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
9
Location
Sussex UK
Vehicles
2014 Shelby Raptor. 2005 AEV Jeep TJ stroker supercharged. 2007 Navara
Occupation
Business owner
Really?! It's just a tension/weight thing!?
That is what I was wondering, what is the sensing behind it. Grip on wheel or physical resistance felt through electronics of steering box. A dangling weight would give both. If it is grip on wheel would need some kind of sensor running entire wheel touch surface. This could cause reliability issues long term.
 

21limited

Member
First Name
James
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
3
Location
Orlando
Vehicles
2021 f150
My guess is that it's tension. I drove around 60 miles yesterday with the 1.5 wrist weight strapped on the wheel and had no warning messages.
 

Dan M.

Well-known member
First Name
Dan
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
206
Reaction score
150
Location
Fayetteville NC
Vehicles
2018 Ford F-150 Lariat
Occupation
Retired Army
My guess is that it's tension. I drove around 60 miles yesterday with the 1.5 wrist weight strapped on the wheel and had no warning messages.
I wonder what would happen if someone was driving 70 MPH down the highway without their hands on the wheel and they had a blowout? Maybe someone can make a video of that.:)
 

Jaym69

Well-known member
First Name
Jason
Joined
Dec 8, 2020
Messages
46
Reaction score
30
Location
WV
Vehicles
2012 F150
Occupation
Investigator
I wonder what would happen if someone was driving 70 MPH down the highway without their hands on the wheel and they had a blowout? Maybe someone can make a video of that.:)
I have also wondered how it would handle something like a blowout or something similar that is irregular from normal driving.
 

OkieCW

Member
First Name
Clint
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
5
Location
Oklahoma
Vehicles
2021 F-150 Platinum Powerboost
Occupation
Attorney
My guess is that it's tension. I drove around 60 miles yesterday with the 1.5 wrist weight strapped on the wheel and had no warning messages.
I’ll have to use this trick today because that warning is annoying. Thanks for the info!
 

OkieCW

Member
First Name
Clint
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
5
Location
Oklahoma
Vehicles
2021 F-150 Platinum Powerboost
Occupation
Attorney
I’m new to this forum and just got an F-150 with the prep package. Although I’ve never experienced any “CoPilot” “self driving” in person, I made sure my truck has the prep package after trying the lane centering on a test drive. I was amazed at how smooth and precise it was and I hope the full self drive doesn’t disappoint. My wife’s Denali goes from line to line like a pinball but this truck is on another level. Also the Dealer said prep hardware couldn’t be added on later so I hope this was worth it when the software comes out later this year.
 

Boosted0407

Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
16
Reaction score
20
Location
Reading, PA
Vehicles
2016 Tacoma TRD Offroad, 2016 BMW 340i, 2018 BMW X1
Admin, what setting did you use? I put mine on “aid only” and medium and it jerks the wheel once the truck hits the line, then over-corrects, and will do that once or twice until it just gives up. I’ll try the different settings as time permits, but seems odd that mine acts like that if yours holds center like that.
 

Touchdwn

Well-known member
First Name
Doug
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
64
Reaction score
34
Location
Keller, Texas
Vehicles
2017 F150 Platinum; 2018 Honda Odyssey
Occupation
Corporate Pilot; retired Air Traffic Controller
Admin, what setting did you use? I put mine on “aid only” and medium and it jerks the wheel once the truck hits the line, then over-corrects, and will do that once or twice until it just gives up. I’ll try the different settings as time permits, but seems odd that mine acts like that if yours holds center like that.
Mine holds center well without jerking.
 

Orlando150

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
80
Reaction score
76
Location
Orlando, FL
Vehicles
Ford
Admin, what setting did you use? I put mine on “aid only” and medium and it jerks the wheel once the truck hits the line, then over-corrects, and will do that once or twice until it just gives up. I’ll try the different settings as time permits, but seems odd that mine acts like that if yours holds center like that.
It's not your fault because it's a little confusing but you are not using Lane Centering. You are using the Lane Keeping System.

Lane Keeping is a system that can be always on (not only with the adaptive cruise) that helps you stay within the lane lines. For example if you are driving and you stop paying attention for a second and start to drift the feature will alert you to take action or take action itself (depending on how you set it up) to keep you from going over the line. Unlike Lane Centering, this system can only nudge your vehicle away from a line if you get to close. If you try to use this system like a "self-driving" car it results in the behavior you describe where the car ping-pongs back and forth between lines. To use it correctly you always need to steer yourself, it only aids you in limited situations. https://www.fordservicecontent.com/...&userMarket=USA&div=f&vFilteringEnabled=False

Lane Centering is part of the Adaptive Cruise system and is closer to "self-driving" in that it attempts to steer for you all the time. When you activate ACC and Lane Centering the car will keep itself centered between the lines (as seen in the video). You must still keep your hands on the wheel but you should only need to steer if the car looses track of the lines. https://www.fordservicecontent.com/...&userMarket=USA&div=f&vFilteringEnabled=False
 
Last edited:

Wilsons66605

Well-known member
First Name
Scott
Joined
Dec 9, 2020
Messages
108
Reaction score
89
Location
Topeka KS
Vehicles
2021 Power Boost Platinum, 2019 Raptor
Occupation
Retired
I was excited about this. In practice it will take some getting used too. It does pull the steering wheel around the curves so it feels like I’m fighting it a little bit. it does have a pop up to warn me to put my hands back on the wheel and my hand is already on the wheel but I must not be giving it enough resistance? Will take a little time and I don’t really trust it yet.

I do like the lane departure warning. It gives the steering wheel a little vibration like driving over rumble strips on the highway. Way better alert than my 2016 Subaru with eyesight that would beep at me then my kids would turn into backseat drivers and ask if I was still in the lane. They were “retrained” to knock that S off! daddy knows how to drive and didn’t need advice from 12 year olds. :)
I was impressed with this version of lane assist. Drove the truck 2 hours on KS turnpike. It worked great! No ping ponging back and forth.
i did get warnings to keep hands on wheel. I also got warnings that lane assist was active if i trued to take control.
 

Boosted0407

Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
16
Reaction score
20
Location
Reading, PA
Vehicles
2016 Tacoma TRD Offroad, 2016 BMW 340i, 2018 BMW X1
It's not your fault because it's a little confusing but you are not using Lane Centering. You are using the Lane Keeping System.

Lane Keeping is a system that can be always on (not only with the adaptive cruise) that helps you stay within the lane lines. For example if you are driving and you stop paying attention for a second and start to drift the feature will alert you to take action or take action itself (depending on how you set it up) to keep you from going over the line. Unlike Lane Centering, this system can only nudge your vehicle away from a line if you get to close. If you try to use this system like a "self-driving" car it results in the behavior you describe where the car ping-pongs back and forth between lines. To use it correctly you always need to steer yourself, it only aids you in limited situations. https://www.fordservicecontent.com/...&userMarket=USA&div=f&vFilteringEnabled=False

Lane Centering is part of the Adaptive Cruise system and is closer to "self-driving" in that it attempts to steer for you all the time. When you activate ACC and Lane Centering the car will keep itself centered between the lines (as seen in the video). You must still keep your hands on the wheel but you should only need to steer if the car looses track of the lines. https://www.fordservicecontent.com/...&userMarket=USA&div=f&vFilteringEnabled=False
Thank you for setting me straight! (Terrible pun, I know)
Co-pilot assist is the only feature my truck is missing that I wish it had
 

Advertisement




 



Advertisement
Top