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Blainestang

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At the fontana event I asked a ford rep about battery sizes.. He told me that:
Standard range battery will be between 90-100kWh
Extended range battery will be around 130kWh

These are usable figures and make sense to me if the the lightning can achieve 2.3m/kwh (similar to the R1T)
Interesting.

Assuming 130kWh usable, then 65% would be 84.5kWh and in order to charge from 15% to 80% in 41 minutes, it would need to average... 124 kW !

So, in that sense this rate and the battery size make sense.

That said, 130kWh doesn't line up with the A/C charging info Ford provided. Ford says the ER battery will add 13 miles of range in 1 hour of 32A/240V charging. So, before losses, that's 7.68kWh in an hour. If it gets 2.3 mi/kWh (300 miles/130kWh), then 7.68kWh would give 17.6 miles. For 13 miles to be correct, it would have to lose 26.5% between the wall and the battery. That's really high losses for Level 2, especially for a 1-hour charge vs. charging all the way to full or charging at a low rate like 120V.

Maybe those numbers are conservative, though? Who knows?
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metroshot

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At the fontana event I asked a ford rep about battery sizes.. He told me that:
Standard range battery will be between 90-100kWh
Extended range battery will be around 130kWh


These are usable figures and make sense to me if the the lightning can achieve 2.3m/kwh (similar to the R1T)
Those battery figures seem correct.

My PHEV 17kWh battery that gets 50 miles on pure EV so doing rough math, the Ford is inline with what I would expect from a larger, heavier, dual motor vehicle...
 

gorwell

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If it gets 2.3 mi/kWh (300 miles/130kWh),
Might wanna reconfigure... F150 isn't getting 2.3 miles/kWh outside of conservative city driving.

The numbers that I saw for Rivian R1T @ best was 2.4 miles/kWh and that was from a reviewer going @ speed on the highway, but going downhill (they drove up a mountain and back down).

This is the view, which I think was after driving down the mountain:

1633473550892.png


Rivian looks to suggest that 2miles/kwH is the "Average" consumption.

F150 is going to be less.
 
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gorwell

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Those battery figures seem correct.

My PHEV 17kWh battery that gets 50 miles on pure EV so doing rough math, the Ford is inline with what I would expect from a larger, heavier, dual motor vehicle...

Those battery numbers are wrong. If they are correct, then somehow Ford managed to work some magic on the truck to make it more aero dynamic than the Rivian R1T (100% not happening).

The Rivian R1T has a 135 KWh battery, and gets 315 EPA rating.... So, F150 needs a bigger battery to get 300+ as well, it's a bigger truck and less aerodynamic...

Estimated battery sizes are:

115kWh for Standard
155kWh for Extended.

https://insideevs.com/news/508674/battery-capacity-ford-f150-lightning/
 

cts888

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Those battery numbers are wrong. If they are correct, then somehow Ford managed to work some magic on the truck to make it more aero dynamic than the Rivian R1T (100% not happening).

The Rivian R1T has a 135 KWh battery, and gets 315 EPA rating.... So, F150 needs a bigger battery to get 300+ as well, it's a bigger truck and less aerodynamic...

Estimated battery sizes are:

115kWh for Standard
155kWh for Extended.

https://insideevs.com/news/508674/battery-capacity-ford-f150-lightning/
I am just relaying what a ford employee told me. He seemed like he knew what he was talking about. Rivian also has 4 motors so they could be similar in efficiency
 
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Blainestang

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Might wanna reconfigure... F150 isn't getting 2.3 miles/kWh outside of conservative city driving.
Yeah, I’m just discussing the implications of the battery sizes claimed by the Ford person at the event.

I think, based on Ford’s info, that the SR will be ~2.0 miles/kWh and ~115 kWh usable and the ER will be ~1.88 miles/kWh and 160 kWh usable.
 

F-150 Prius

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At the fontana event I asked a ford rep about battery sizes.. He told me that:
Standard range battery will be between 90-100kWh
Extended range battery will be around 130kWh

These are usable figures and make sense to me if the the lightning can achieve 2.3m/kwh (similar to the R1T)
The Rivian R1T is 135kWh for the standard battery. I don't remember a size being given for the "mega" pack (180kWh estimated) or the 105kWh model (both late availability in 2022.)
I think this info is current as of the Rivian event at Breckenridge a month ago.
ref:
https://www.kbb.com/rivian/r1t/2021/

Reports on the rapid changes in the EV industry observe "charge anxiety is the new range anxiety" … consumers are less concerned about the size of the tank and more concerned about where to fill up and how long it will take to fill up.
FWIW, when I've read about or spoken with people using EA chargers, the thing they usually note is erratic results even from one charging pedestal to the next at the same location, not just the expectable variables of battery condition and ambient temperature.
Anything below 120-150kW is what I'd call "slow" fast charging. It's not realistic for distance driving or towing to wait an hour to absorb 150kW.
Tesla has 250kW "V3" Superchargers, but the current cars can absorb that kind of power for only a few minutes. VW and GMC say they're aiming above 350kW. Numerous auto industry OEMs like Mahle say they have battery technology coming to market in a 2025 time frame and "everyone" says battery supply shortages will continue beyond 2025. I think Ford has its battery game sorted out with SK Innovation and is building Blue Oval City.
Whatever arrives in the second generation of the Lightning (circa 2025) has the potential to be state of the art in battery technology. Whatever we get in '22 (from all the EV makers) is obsolescent. I'm getting the Lightning with the expectation that it will be as good as it gets but for only maybe 2-3 years. The technology is advancing too quickly for consumers to "plan" for 2025 (other than to get an order in the system as early as possible.)
 

Pilot2022

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The Rivian R1T is 135kWh for the standard battery. I don't remember a size being given for the "mega" pack (180kWh estimated) or the 105kWh model (both late availability in 2022.)
I think this info is current as of the Rivian event at Breckenridge a month ago.
ref:
https://www.kbb.com/rivian/r1t/2021/

Reports on the rapid changes in the EV industry observe "charge anxiety is the new range anxiety" … consumers are less concerned about the size of the tank and more concerned about where to fill up and how long it will take to fill up.
FWIW, when I've read about or spoken with people using EA chargers, the thing they usually note is erratic results even from one charging pedestal to the next at the same location, not just the expectable variables of battery condition and ambient temperature.
Anything below 120-150kW is what I'd call "slow" fast charging. It's not realistic for distance driving or towing to wait an hour to absorb 150kW.
Tesla has 250kW "V3" Superchargers, but the current cars can absorb that kind of power for only a few minutes. VW and GMC say they're aiming above 350kW. Numerous auto industry OEMs like Mahle say they have battery technology coming to market in a 2025 time frame and "everyone" says battery supply shortages will continue beyond 2025. I think Ford has its battery game sorted out with SK Innovation and is building Blue Oval City.
Whatever arrives in the second generation of the Lightning (circa 2025) has the potential to be state of the art in battery technology. Whatever we get in '22 (from all the EV makers) is obsolescent. I'm getting the Lightning with the expectation that it will be as good as it gets but for only maybe 2-3 years. The technology is advancing too quickly for consumers to "plan" for 2025 (other than to get an order in the system as early as possible.)

ofcourse, tech will keep improving but I really don’t get the change anxiety. SR Pro will work for my needs, whether it is now or 2025. Sure, it will be nice to have extra range or faster charging times but if you are buying an EV with eyes open and making sure it meets your needs now and for info the future, I don’t see why one needs to keep thinking about tech upgrades.
Unlike an iPhone or a computer, where current software becomes slower and slower with age, you should be able to go from point A to point B as long as battery pack is useful or can be replaced. (Assuming I get the truck in 2023, warranty is 8 years, so at least you know that battery replacement is viable at least through 2031).
 
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